PROSPECT | FINDON | BURNSIDE HOSPITAL | BLACKWOOD
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  • HomeLatest NewsThe Physio Clinic Blog
  • The Physio Clinic Blog

    The hip is a ball and socket joint and with severe OA and functional limitations, an Orthopaedic Surgeon may suggest a total hip replacement if conservative measures have not been successful.

    With any surgery, there is potential for complications and dislocation of a new hip is possible. During a combination of certain movements, the ball may exit the socket causing the hip to dislocate.

    According to Dargel et al. (2014), the incidence of hip dislocations varies between 0.2% to 10% per year for a first-time hip replacement.

    Evidence-based treatment plans after your hip surgery

    After a total hip peplacement, a physiotherapist will visit you in hospital to commence rehabilitation. During this session your physiotherapist will indicate certain movements to avoid to keep the hip in a safe position and avoid the chances of causing a hip dislocation.

    The restrictions you will need to adhere to will differ depending on the approach your Orthopaedic Surgeon took to access your hip. These are recommended for at least the first six weeks to allow your muscles to regain their stability around the joint.

    Posterior (from the back):

    • DO NOT bend your hip greater than 90 degrees (includes sitting on low chairs/toilet, bending down to pick things up off the group, sitting too far forward in bed/chair).
    • DO NOT cross your legs.
    • DO NOT rotate your leg internally (hip, knee and toes in a straight line) (includes pivoting when turning).

    Lateral (from the side):

    • DO NOT bring your leg backwards.
    • DO NOT cross your legs.
    • DO NOT rotate your leg outwardly (hip, knee and toes in a straight line) (includes pivoting when turning).

    Anterior (from the front):

    • DO NOT bring your leg backwards.
    • DO NOT rotate your leg outwardly (hip, knee and toes in a straight line) (includes pivoting when turning).
    • You may sleep on your side with a pillow between your legs as comfortable.

    It is important to have an awareness of the potential for hip dislocation as a complication post-surgery. However, with adherence to physiotherapy advice the prevalence is quite low.

    Our physiotherapists encourage patients to feel confident in their new hip.

    At The Physio Clinic we work with several Orthopaedic Surgeons in an outpatient and inpatient setting and are always happy to answer any concerns with your new hip. We want your new hip to give you a new look on life!

    Kristian Ricci – Physiotherapist

    Contact The Physio Clinic on 8342 1233 or click below to book online.

    Prospect | Findon | Burnside Hospital | Blackwood

     

    References: Dargel, J, Oppermann, J, Bruggemann, G & Eysel, P 2014, ‘Dislocation Following Total Hip Replacement’, Deutsches Arzteblatt International, vol. 111, no. 51-51, pp. 884-890.